Quantcast



 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Does holding down an epeleptic help?

Post: #1
04-14-2012, 11:34 AM
member62864 Offline
**

Does holding down an epeleptic help?

I am actually just curious if holding down a person getting seizures help?

I have read on the other thread that it would be better to simply put a pillow and wait for it to stop.

That got me thinking, will there be consequences if we simply hold down the patient or tie him / her to the bed so that they don't hurt themselves?



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #2
04-15-2012, 06:11 PM
member9955 Offline
****

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

It's not going to help the seizure get better or end, if that's what you're asking.

And if the goal is to keep them from hurting themselves, then yes, a pillow is just as good and it's fine to let the seizure carry out. I don't see how tying them down is going to help anything. So long as they're staying on the floor/bed/whatever, then restraining them is just going to be jarring when they come back out of the seizure.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #3
05-16-2012, 12:57 AM
member22398 Offline
**

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

As far as I was taught, you're not supposed to hold them down.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #4
06-16-2012, 03:09 AM
member90040 Offline
**

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

No, you should not hold them down. Being restrained can cause further injury. You should put them on their side and step away until the seizure finishes.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #5
07-03-2012, 01:31 PM
member22018 Offline
**

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

​If someone is having a seizure you shouldn't hold them down. As other users suggested, the key thing you can do to help is to prevent them from injury.

If they are on the floor you should put a pillow under their head to prevent head injury. If something is tight round the person’s neck, such as a tie, it is recommended to loosen it as they may have difficulty breathing.You shouldn’t attempt to move them to another location unless they are in real danger such as being in a busy road. Instead, if possible, move objects such as chairs or tables away from the person to prevent injury. Carefully turn them onto their side to prevent choking from any fluids in the mouth. Do not attempt to put your fingers in their mouth as this could result in choking and may cause difficulty breathing. Occasionally, tongue biting may occur but this is usually minor and will heal. Do not leave the person who is seizing.

Calling an ambulance is not usually necessary. If the person has a seizure for longer than 5 minutes (they usually last only 2 minutes) then an ambulance needs to be called. Also this is the case if the person doesn’t regain full consciousness or sustains serious injury because of the seizure, e.g. burns if they were near a hot cooker. If this is a person’s first seizure,they will need to go to a doctor after the seizure. Hope this helps clarify what to do in the event of a seizure.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #6
09-15-2012, 03:07 PM
member45978 Offline
**

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

First aid is an essential part of life and every person should know it for their own good.
Knowing how to help someone during and after an epileptic seizure may help you, and them, feel more confident if a seizure happens.
First aid for epilepsy is basically very simple. It keeps the person safe until the seizure stops naturally by itself. It is important for the public to know how to respond to all seizures, including the most noticeable kind which is the generalized tonic clonic seizure, or convulsions.
Helping a person in an epileptic seizure may depend on the type of seizures they have.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #7
10-16-2012, 12:35 PM
member3458 Offline
***

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?


I was also taught that you shouldn't hold them down - that the best thing to do is ensure they are not in any immediate danger and let them come out of the fit themselves. I can remember a man who was having a fit in the middle of the street a few years ago now and his wife was doing everything in her power to hold him down - almost as if she did nobody else would notice, I think she was embarrassed. All it did was serve to cause more stress to the man AND his wife, as well as attract more people, some of whom thought the couple were fighting.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #8
10-16-2012, 03:09 PM
member9955 Offline
****

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

(10-16-2012 12:35 PM)livvi Wrote:  
I was also taught that you shouldn't hold them down - that the best thing to do is ensure they are not in any immediate danger and let them come out of the fit themselves. I can remember a man who was having a fit in the middle of the street a few years ago now and his wife was doing everything in her power to hold him down - almost as if she did nobody else would notice, I think she was embarrassed. All it did was serve to cause more stress to the man AND his wife, as well as attract more people, some of whom thought the couple were fighting.



Maybe she just didn't know what to do? If he didn't regularly have seizures, she could've been freaking out and just trying to force it to stop. I have seen people try to do that before and like you said, it ends up stressing both people out instead.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post: #9
03-09-2015, 01:55 PM
member71547 Offline
***

RE: Does holding down an epeleptic help?

Epilepsy runs in my family on my mother's side. Usually, my relatives grew out of these seizures as they became older. Holding down a person while they are having a seizure does help. I know it's paramount to make sure they do not swallow their tongues. I always know to hold them on their sides while they are on the floor. However, these are for the more volatile seizures where the body jerks around excessively.



Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 




                 
                 

Copyright 2007-2017 Chaotic Inceptions - Wellescent.com